A 21st Century Education – Technology Not Required

A 21st Century Education – Technology Not Required

Nearly everyone agrees – students today require a 21st century education. Defining what a 21st century education actually is and what it looks like, however, is a bit trickier. The economic world that our students will be entering is one marked by rapid change. Jobs consisting of routine tasks, be they cognitive or manual, are increasingly done by machines or cheaper…

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A Strategy For Diluting Concentrated Poverty In Detroit

A strategy for diluting concentrated poverty in Detroit

Decades of research has shown that growing up in concentrated poverty can irreversibly limit a child’s prospects for future success and, sadly, no region has more concentrated poverty than metro Detroit. According to 2016 Brookings Institution report, metro Detroit has the highest rate of concentrated poverty among the top 25 metro areas in the U.S. with 32 percent of poor…

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Job Security: Or How To Prepare For Jobs That Can’t Be Automated

Job Security: Or How To Prepare For Jobs That Can’t Be Automated

It used to be that parents who wanted job security urged kids to get a degree with immediately practical applications—like Eboo Patel’s mother, who wanted him to major in business instead of sociology, as he recalls in this blog from the Chronicle of Higher Education. But now, more and more jobs that used to seem impervious to automation turn out…

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Are Low Wages Causing The Skilled Trades Shortages?

Are low wages causing the skilled trades shortages?

The Grand Rapids Business Journal recently published an op-ed and comment that lays out the two most likely reasons for more demand by employers for skilled trades workers in manufacturing and construction than there are qualified applicants for those jobs. Which of the two explanations is accurate has profound implications for public policy, particularly for K-12 education. The op-ed is…

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Michigan Colleges And Economic Mobility, Part 2

Michigan colleges and economic mobility, part 2

In my last post I analyzed an important data set recently released by economist Raj Chetty and colleagues, that measures every college’s contribution to economic mobility in America. I looked at the percentage of the poorest students in each cohort at Michigan colleges who, by their early thirties, were in the top 40% of earners. The results were fairly disappointing…

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